Rental housing, auto repair developments make headway | Government

Debora Carley

Marshall’s planning commission on Sept. 23 lent favorable recommendations to a pair of measures that will be crucial for the continued progress of two developments within the village. With Marshall-based Little Creek Construction planning a rental housing development on the south side of Whistle Street and entrepreneur Maksym Parker looking […]

Marshall’s planning commission on Sept. 23 lent favorable recommendations to a pair of measures that will be crucial for the continued progress of two developments within the village.

With Marshall-based Little Creek Construction planning a rental housing development on the south side of Whistle Street and entrepreneur Maksym Parker looking to start an auto repair business at 502 W. Main St., the planning commission recommended the village board approve a rezone for the former and a conditional use permit for the latter.

For Little Creek’s housing project to proceed on the village’s Whistle Street property, the land must be rezoned from highway business to multi-family residential, which will then allow for the construction of three 16-unit rental buildings. Little Creek must also receive approval for a certified survey map in order to create two separate lots on the property, which the planning commission has not yet reviewed.

Little Creek owner Mike Filkouski is working with Reedsburg-based civil engineering firm Vierbicher Associates Inc. and Middleton-based Knothe & Bruce Architects to prepare the certified survey map, but he wanted to secure the rezone first before moving forward with the CSM. The decision to create two separate lots on the Whistle Street property corresponds with Little Creek’s plan to reserve two of the rental buildings for people ages 55 and older, while the demographics of the third building is still undetermined.

As for the auto repair business planned for West Main Street, Parker’s intention to also sell vehicles on the property will not be possible without a conditional use permit. The property, once home to the Kwik Trip car wash, cannot feature auto sales due to general business zoning.

The planning commission recommended approval of the permit on the condition that no more than six cars could be displayed at a time. Parker must also submit a site plan for the business within nine months, which would serve to address commission concerns over outside storage, lighting and overall layout of the property.

Parker, who purchased the vacant Main Street lot about a month ago, originally planned for the business to be primarily a car dealership, though resident input and commission guidance in February convinced him to refocus the enterprise around auto repairs.

Other commission action:

• Approved a site plan for Joe Marceil and Kari Augustine to allow for the extension of a fence on the west side of their 113 E. Main St. property.

• Recommended the village board approve a conditional use permit for residents Anthony and Katherine Spannbauer for adding a detached garage onto their property at 506 W. Main St.

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