Terminology added to reduce confusion on driver-assist features

Debora Carley

Terminology added to reduce confusion on driver-assist features WASHINGTON — A coalition of consumer safety groups and automotive experts is once again urging automakers, regulators and other stakeholders to adopt standard terms for advanced driver-assistance systems. AAA, Consumer Reports, J.D. Power, the National Safety Council, Partners for Automated Vehicle Education […]

Terminology added to reduce confusion on driver-assist features

Cadillac Driver Assist

WASHINGTON — A coalition of consumer safety groups and automotive experts is once again urging automakers, regulators and other stakeholders to adopt standard terms for advanced driver-assistance systems.

AAA, Consumer Reports, J.D. Power, the National Safety Council, Partners for Automated Vehicle Education and SAE International on Tuesday released a set of updated and expanded terms for driver-assist features that they say will reduce driver confusion as the technologies become more common.

The group started the effort in 2019 with an initial list of standardized names that was endorsed by the U.S. Department of Transportation in 2020 during the Trump administration.

“ADAS features have become increasingly prevalent in new vehicles and have the potential to reduce traffic crashes and save thousands of lives each year,” the group said in a statement. “However, the terminology used by automakers to describe ADAS features varies widely, which can confuse consumers and make it difficult to understand the vehicle’s functions.”

The six categories on the list are collision warning, collision intervention, driving-control assistance, parking assistance, other driver-assistance systems and driver monitoring.

The newly added terms are lane-centering assistance, indirect driver-monitoring system, direct driver-monitoring system and driver reengagement system. Other terms include blind-spot monitoring, automatic emergency braking and adaptive cruise control.

The terms, which are updated as more systems are introduced, are not meant to replace an automaker’s proprietary system or package names but instead should be used to help consumers access clear and consistent information on window stickers and in owner’s manuals and other marketing materials, the group said.

— Audrey LaForest

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